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6 'SURE THINGS' FOR BURNING FAT
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Default 6 'SURE THINGS' FOR BURNING FAT - 10-05-2007, 02:15 PM

6 'SURE THINGS' FOR BURNING FAT, PART 1
By Tom Venuto

There are not many "sure things" in life. Almost every worthwhile endeavor comes with a certain degree of risk and no assurance of the outcome. In the case of building your dream body and chiseling it down into a lean machine, there's always some trial, error and experimentation necessary, especially because each person's genetics, body type and physiology are so unique. But what if you could skip most of the trial and error by placing your bets on "sure things" instead of guessing or gambling? That would be great wouldn't it? Unfortunately, in the health and fitness field, there appear to be fewer "sure things" than anywhere else! Fitness experts are notorious for having opinions and theories that range from one extreme to another. Many competing fat-loss programs represent polar opposites, with high carb vs low carb being the most common example. Scientists often end their papers with, "more research isneeded" and they almost never stick their necks out and take a strong stand, unless the evidence is air-tight and rock-solid. But amidst all the chaos, confusion and conflicting advice of the nutrition and fitness world, there are a small handful of "SURE THINGS" and you're about to learn them all. These are things that almost all the researchers and most of the fitness and dietetic professionals agree on. Of course, We will never get 100% consensus on the subjects of exercise and nutrition, because there's always a lone dissenter out there somewhere. Even in the face of science, people sometimes believe weird things. People also often believe in their dietary approaches NOT for scientific reasons, but for environmental, spiritual or humanitarian reasons. Nevertheless, if we use science as our guide, then the weight of the evidence is heavy enough that I will stick MY neck out and recommend to just about everyone that these are SURE THINGS, and that you can't go wrong by applying these principles in your own program immediately...

SURE THING #1: FOCUS ON THE CALORIC DEFICIT One thing that virtually the entire scientific community agrees on is that the law of energy balance is always with us. In order to burn body fat, you must expend more calories than you consume. This is known as having a "caloric deficit." Although there are a few people who still claim that "calories don't count," I will be as bold as to say that those people are dead wrong.

PLEASE NOTE CAREFULLY: There is a huge difference between saying"you don't have to count calories" and "calories don't count." Some diet programs are "ad libitum" in nature. This means they do not advise calorie counting; they simply tell you what to eatand what not to eat. You eat as you please, as long as you follow the food restrictions provided. What they usually don't tell you is that the eating restrictions are the equivalent of having built-in automatic calorie control. These programs do not refute the law of energy balance, they confirm it. When a diet program claims, "Eat as much as you want and still lose weight", you are hearing a Big Fat Lie. Incidentally, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) says it is illegal to make this claim and they can sue you if you do. Many people still deny the law of calorie balance in the face of scientific evidence. For example, some of the old school low-carbers are notorious for disputing the calorie balance equation, in favor of believing in some type of "metabolic advantage" that comes from low carbs. I.e., "eat X grams of carbs or less, and you can eat as much as you want." To them, I will quote the Amazing Randy and say, "Put up or shut up."Lets see that theory tested out under calorie-controlled conditions in a lab. I assure you, if you have a caloric maintenance level of 2000 calories a day and you eat 3000 calories a day of protein and fat (no carbs) you WILL gain fat! Perhaps it will be harder to consume that many calories in the form of protein and fat as compared to sugar and protein and fat, but if you manage to pull off that gastronomic feat, you WILL gain weight nonetheless (and low carb writers might be surprised at how much food some people can shovel down their throats, even sans carbs!) Fortunately, the low carb community today has some intelligent voices speaking out, saying that low carb does not mean "unlimited calories" and that low carb diets also require a caloric deficit; they may simply make it easier to achieve that deficit, automatically without counting calories. While I am very much in favor of doing things "by the numbers," programs that tend to make you "automatically" eat less without counting anything are not a bad thing at all (the spontaneous reduction in caloric intake often occurs due to an appetite-suppressive effect of certain diets, and or due to the selection of low calorie-density foods which are highly satiating). That said, no combination of foods, elimination of foods, or arrangement of macro nutrients will override the law of calorie balance. To lose fat, you have to eat less than you burn, period. Furthermore, you must be diligent about maintaining your deficit, because:

(1) Energy balance is dynamic, and what is a deficit for you today, may no longer be a significant deficit six months from now

(2) If your maintenance calories are 2000, and your intake is 1500 one day (a deficit) and 2500 the next (a surplus), you have NOT achieved a caloric deficit over the two day period - you are in energy balance.

Conveniently, most people seem to have some kind of "selective amnesia" and they only remember the days they were in a deficit! A consistent deficit over time is the key! The sooner you drill this truth into your head and accept that the cornerstone of fat loss is a caloric deficit, the sooner you'll be able to think clearly about your nutritional choices and the better you'll be able to judge everything you ever read, see and hear about nutrition, for the rest of your life. By the way, did you know that there are two corollaries to the law of calorie balance, which almost no one teaches? In my Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle program, I reveal these little-known calorie corollaries (chapter 6) and I teach you the exact, scientific formulas for calculating your ideal calorie intake for burning the maximum amount of fat, without losing muscle or slowing down your metabolism.


FREE YOUR MIND AND YOUR ASS WILL FOLLOW

Last edited by RickB; 10-13-2007 at 07:33 PM. Reason: broke it into paragraphs for us with ADD ;-)
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Default 10-05-2007, 05:45 PM

great post mac. you beat me to it as i was going to post this later on tonight




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Default 10-08-2007, 05:23 AM

LOL, that burn the fat program is really enlightening is'nt it.


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Default 10-08-2007, 04:33 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoaringMad Mac View Post
LOL, that burn the fat program is really enlightening is'nt it.
yeah




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sure thing number 2
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Default sure thing number 2 - 10-13-2007, 05:40 PM

SURE THING #2: EXERCISE IS THE KEY TO LONG TERM MAINTENANCE

It seems almost unthinkable that there would be any question about the value of exercise in weight control, but believe it or not, this is the topic of a very heated debate. I wonder if maybe all the energy that is spent arguing about "the best way" to achieve weight loss, would be better directed at finding the best way to maintain weight loss... after all, losing weight is as simple as calories in versus calories out and there's about a Bazillion different ways you can do it. The hard part is keeping it off. Well, we already KNOW the best way to keep weight off for good... and it's a sure thing!

There's no debate about the need for a calorie deficit. In fact, focusing on the calorie deficit was fat loss 'sure thing number one!' However, scientists and practitioners alike often argue about whether you should create a calorie deficit by decreasing food intake or by increasing exercise and other activity (or,a combination of both) A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism in early 2007 had fitness professionals and exercise addicts up in arms when it said, "Diet and exercise take offthe pounds equally." The study found no difference in weight loss between one group that created a deficit with exercise and another group which created a deficit with food reduction and no exercise. Other studies have produced the opposite results - distinct weight loss benefits were achieved with the addition of exercise to caloric restriction. Differences in study design, including the type of exercise used,may have influenced these conflicting results. The point is, a debate does exist. But even if you take the weight off with severe caloric restriction(starvation diets) and no exercise, the real question is: What happens next? That is the question the researchers in the recent study failed to ask. Fortunately, many others have, and they all came to the same very decisive conclusion: The difference between "losers" and "maintainers" is exercise. most people in our quick fix society just don't seem to care about what happens in the long term. They want the weight off...fast... NOW!

Ironically, it's these short term results that continue to be advertised, highlighted and remembered. What a different story would be told if we did some follow up case studies... How about a "reunion" for all these starvation diet "success stories"along with all the extreme makeover and rapid weight loss reality show contestants... but with one "Venuto" catch: The "reunion" has to be a surprise. Call up people randomly after 2-5 years and tell them they have 48 hours to show up (so they wouldn't have time for another crash diet). What do YOU think would happen? I think that you'd see confirmation of the statistics we've all heard before: 90-95% of dieters gain back the weight they lost... IF you look at the long term. At around 6 months, most people hit a plateau or rough patch and many fall off the wagon. At 12 months, most people are defeated and have already started gaining back the weight. After 3 years, almost everyone has gained back the weight, and some have gone through several unsuccessful cycles.

What are the successful maintainers - the top 5% - doing differently? Doesn't anyone care? Why does almost everyone insist on following the herd? (If you follow the herd, that means you have to step in a lot of manure, you know!) One quality of almost all successful people is the ability to delay gratification. A quality of almost all failures is the tendency to seek instant gratification (with no long term time perspective or long term goal setting skills). There are Japanese technology and manufacturing companies that have 100-year and even 250-year business plans, yet most human beings won't take the time to think or care about the consequences of their actions just a year or two down the road. If you want to be a loser, then follow the herd. If you want to be a successful maintainer, then find out what successful maintainers do and do THAT instead.

Fortunately, studies have identified the qualities of successful long term maintainers. One study was published by Judy Kruger and colleagues in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. Major differences were seen between "losers" and "maintainers": A higher proportion of successful maintainers reported exercising 30 minutes or more daily, and they also reported adding other physical activity such as recreation, sports, physical work, and so on, into their daily schedules. Lifting weights was also a distinguishing factor between groups,as substantially more maintainers included weight training in their exercise regimens than did the losers. "Reducing sedentary activities" (less TV watching, etc), was also a significant difference between those who successfully maintained and those who did not. Clearly, exercise was the difference that made the difference and results like these have been reproduced in study after study.

One group which has been the subject of much study is the National Weight Control registry (NWCR), which consists of men and women who have lost at least 30 lbs and kept it off for over a year. Many NWCR participants have kept weight off for 5 yrs or more. Although conclusions drawn from these types of questionnaire-based studies can't prove causation, this is the type of group, in my opinion, that you should study the most and look for patterns. In the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Mary Klem, Rena Wing and their colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh published their research about the NWCR in a paper called, "A descriptive study of individuals successful at long-term maintenance of substantial weight loss." The part where subjects were asked how they maintained their weight loss was important and worth quoting: "Perhaps most important, nearly every member of the registry reported using a combination of diet PLUS exercise to both lose weight and maintain the weight loss. This finding provides further evidence that long term maintenance of weight loss is facilitated by regular physical activity." So what does all of this mean to you? well, that probably depends on what stage in the game you are currently at:

(1) If you haven't started a structured fat reduction program yet,then choose one which emphasizes the long term and not the quick fix, and which includes nutrition and exercise (not just a diet).One program that fits these criteria perfectly is Burn The Fat,feed The Muscle

(2) If you're currently on a diet program that doesn't include exercise - then add an exercise program immediately and you will skyrocket your odds of long term success.

(3) If you've already lost weight and you've done it with a combination of caloric restriction and exercise, congratulations...but keep in mind that if you want to join the successful maintainers you have to keep it up! You may be able to cut back on the amount of exercise, but you have to keep training!

(4) If you've lost weight and you've done it with ONLY caloric restriction, you should be also congratulated, but also be warned: NOW is the time to start exercising. At this time, adding an exercise program into your lifestyle is the single most important thing you can do to maintain your ideal weight long term.

Which type of exercise you choose is far less important than simply choosing some type of cardiovascular or aerobic activity which will cumulatively burn a lot of calories, and combining that with strength training. Many things are debated among obesity researchers and exercise scientists today, oddly enough, even whether exercise is necessary during a weight loss program. One thing, however, that almost EVERY expert and researcher nowagrees on is that to keep the unwanted pounds off and to maintain your perfect weight for life, exercise is a SURE THING.

Last edited by RickB; 10-13-2007 at 07:42 PM. Reason: Again, adding paragraphs to make it easier to read
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