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Reload this Page Carbs vs Calories
Diet & Nutrition Tips on eating healthy and eating enough. What and how much you eat can make a huge difference in building muscle & improving performance.


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Default 09-07-2004, 12:34 PM

I'm not particularly "in the know" when it comes to nutrition, so excuse this probably simple question. I have spent some time reading about fat loss and muscle growth, but am left baffled when i read conflicting statements. From what I can gather, the Atkins diet works, yes? This means that while you are on it, you are losing weight while eating few carbohydrates, and probably more protein that you've ever eaten before. I assume that the low carbohydrates means a low calorie intake? From posts on here I can also gather that muscle growth relies heavily on the amount of protein in your system. My question is this, is it really necessary to be eating lots of high calorie foods when weight lifting, if you are taking in lots of protein, and why is the atkins diet not a good way to lose fat and supplement your weight training at the same time?
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Default 09-07-2004, 12:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudLighter
From what I can gather, the Atkins diet works, yes?
For some yes. For really carb sensitive individuals probably a whole lot more then say.. me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudLighter
I assume that the low carbohydrates means a low calorie intake?
Not necessarily. You can still get a lot of calories from protein and fat sources.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudLighter
From posts on here I can also gather that muscle growth relies heavily on the amount of protein in your system.
True

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudLighter
My question is this, is it really necessary to be eating lots of high calorie foods when weight lifting, if you are taking in lots of protein, and why is the atkins diet not a good way to lose fat and supplement your weight training at the same time?
It's not necessary to eat high calories foods.. just enough calories to gain weight. From good sources like chicken, rice, complex carbs, fruit.. not bacon, pancakes, too many eggs..

Your body gets it's fuel from carbs. So by cutting them out, you force your body to burn a less efficient source of fuel, and that's fat. It's a ketosis state where you change how your body burns energy.

You are working out. You need fuel. You need lots of energy. You can lose fat another way. Build muscle.. then eat just enough to maintain it while creating a slight calorie deficit so that you do not starve but force your body to burn off that fat.
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Default 09-07-2004, 12:42 PM

U say enough calories to gain weight, does this mean gain fat, or muscle? How are the calories obtained from chicken good, and the ones from bacon not so good?

I used this site to find out my basal metabolic rate....


Input Weight is: 186 in U.S. Pounds
Input Height is: 75 in U.S. Inches
Input Age is: 18
Input Gender is: male
------------------------------------------------------------ --------------------
The Metabolism Results Are:2014.1 calories per day is your Basal Caloric Rate. This is:
no more then 67.139 grams of fat (30%) for your Basal Caloric Rate
75.532 grams of protein (15%) for your Basal Caloric Rate
276.95 grams of carbohydrate (55%) for your Basal Caloric Rate


2618.4 calories per day recommended for your Active Caloric Rate. This is:
no more then 87.281 grams of fat (30%) for your Active Caloric Rate
98.191 grams of protein (15%) for your Active Caloric Rate
360.03 grams of carbohydrate (55%) for your Active Caloric Rate

Mda, can you please tell me if I need to be eating more than 2618.4 calories per day for bodybuilding. Looking at that, the amount of protein seems low, nowhere near 1gram per pound of body mass, so should I eat 186grams of protein and the same number of grams of fat and carbohydrate?

Argh, this stuff messes with my head - wayyy too confusing at times
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Default 09-07-2004, 12:45 PM

Atkins is also not good for weight training because you need carbs to replenish muscle glycogen stores that have been depleated during your workout.
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Default 09-07-2004, 12:48 PM

I'd say a good baseline would be

30% protein
50-55% carbs
10-20% fats (mostly good ones)

Each person is going to require something slightly different when it comes to protein. .8 might be the RDA but if you train hard, maybe 1.0 is better. And if you are larger and already have more muscle, then 1.3 is best...

It's hard to say that the calorie numbers you plugged in will work. Maybe. I'd have more protein then 15%. And less fat for sure. Carbs are good. Starchy ones and complex. Not simple refined sugars.

You probably don't need more then 2600 a day for building muscle. Depends on if you are going for the bulk diet as well.. Add another 500 a day if you want to gain some weight. Or cut it back to lose.

Those calculators are just a general estimate. There's a few formulas in that Burn the Fat review that I'm reading. It really does go into details on how to find your EXACT numbers.

The ratio seems a bit low to me. There's no magic ratio because each person is different. But 30/50/20 seems like a good baseline. Adjust as necessary.

What you can do is try that calorie intake for a month. And monitor your progress. Cut back if you feel like you are putting on too much fat. Or increase it if you are always hungry.
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